Letters to the Editor: March 9, 2016

We need a businessman

Let’s look back in history to another successful CEO who turned a down-and-out company into a remarkable comeback enterprise of American ingenuity.

I’m talking about Chrysler car company’s CEO, Lee Iacocca. His business skills as an entrepreneur are similar to today’s Donald Trump.

Let’s not forget how Iacocca led the once-dismal Chrysler corporation back into the top three American car companies: Ford, General Motors and Chrysler-Dodge.

Here’s a businessman who spearheaded one of the greatest feats of turning a company into a success. And that is what capitalism is all about.

So why can’t the American people of today see that in Donald Trump? A successful businessman who is being badgered because he came from money.

As Americans, we respected people who made money. We didn’t belittle them. Just like Iacocca, he made a mountain out of a molehill.

And as Americans, we should look up to success like that and learn from it, not quash it like Hillary or Bernie Sanders want to do about the self-made man.

To them, “capitalism” is a dirty word.

So, if Iacocca made Chrysler a success as the savvy businessman, then businessman Trump can do the same with our broken country.

Lee Iacocca, the Rockefellers, Carnegie, Vanderbilts and all great men of money are what made this country great, through innovation, productivity, insight and chutzpah.

Making money is and will always be the American dream, not to be envied, but to be appreciated.

Al Ulus

Somerton

Poverty is out of control

Out of the 10 largest cities in America, Philadelphia is the poorest, with a conservative poverty level of 26 percent.

One of Mayor Kenney’s solutions to Philadelphia’s poverty crisis is to raise taxes on everyone, whether you get hit with higher property taxes as a homeowner or a “sin” tax as a soda drinker, or perhaps both. And don’t forget, most likely the water tax is going up as well. Kenney is using the same playbook as the Nutter administration, yet promotes himself as an agent of change. New taxes are not a solution to poverty. Maybe voters need to stop electing former “establishment” City Council members as mayor. Mic drop.

Jason Kaye

Rhawnhurst

Clean up Somerton

As a longtime resident of Somerton who takes pride in our neighborhood, I have watched several businesses (and a few homeowners) show little regard for trash that ends up on their property, either from people who weren’t taught to use trash cans or trash cans put out on windy days that blow all over.

If you live near Tomlinson Road and Bustleton Avenue, you can usually follow the trail of coffee cups, water bottles, candy wrappers, etc. back to Wawa and CVS. We need some trash cans on corners and lessons in school about littering.

The grassy area behind George Washington High School is an eyesore, and we are hoping to get a group of Somerton neighbors together for the city’s ninth annual Philly Spring Cleanup on Saturday, April 9, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. to clean that area up.

Please join the Facebook group Somerton Neighbors for current information on this and other issues relevant to Somerton.

P.S. If you see litter, join the cause — Somerton Pride — and pick it up.

Donna DiDonato

Somerton

Murt helping the blind

On behalf of our nearly 2,500 clients in and around the city of Philadelphia, Associated Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired would like to express our sincere gratitude to state Rep. Tom Murt for his tireless effort in advocating for our area’s blind population. The budget gridlock in Harrisburg has created tense and uncertain times for many area nonprofits, and Rep. Murt’s devotion and activism on behalf of the blind and visually impaired has kept our issues front and center in the General Assembly.

Rep. Murt understands our mission of promoting self-esteem, independence and self-determination in people who are blind or visually impaired. Thank you to Rep. Tom Murt for his hard work and compassion for our area’s blind and visually impaired population.

Patricia C. Johnson

President and CEO, Associated Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired