Cancer Treatment Centers founder receives honor

Richard J. Stephenson received the Horatio Alger Award, which has honored charitable leaders for 70 years.

Passionate about his work: Cancer Treatment Centers of America chairman and founder Richard J. Stephenson was recently recognized by The Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans for his entrepreneurial spirit and passionate commitment to the wellbeing of others. He is pictured above with Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. PHOTO: ADRIAN MAYES / CANCER TREATMENT CENTERS OF AMERICA

Cancer Treatment Centers of America chairman and founder Richard J. Stephenson was recently recognized by The Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans for his entrepreneurial spirit and passionate commitment to the wellbeing of others.

There are five CTCA hospitals in the United States, including one at 1331 E. Wyoming Ave.

For the last 70 years, the Horatio Alger Award has been bestowed upon leaders who are committed to higher education and charitable efforts in their local communities.

In 1988, following his mother’s battle with bladder cancer, Stephenson opened his first CTCA hospital and committed to delivering cancer patients and their families with the Mother Standard of care — the kind of care you would want for your loved one.

Pictured are (standing) John H. Scully, John Elway, Roger S. Penske, Harold B. Matzner, Lenard B. Tessler, Alain Bouchard, (sitting) Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, Byron Pitts, Valerie Montgomery Rice, Marcia G. Taylor, Stephenson, Melody Hobson. PHOTO: ADRIAN MAYES / CANCER TREATMENT CENTERS OF AMERICA

In 1991, Stephenson created the Gateway for Cancer Research, setting out on a personal quest to transform cancer research and care by empowering patients with integrative therapies and innovative treatment options.

Stephenson was among 11 people honored at a ceremony in Washington, D.C.

Other honorees included John Elway, who quarterbacked the Denver Broncos to two Super Bowl victories and is now the team’s general manager, and Roger Penske, a businessman and auto racing team owner whose drivers have won 16 Indianapolis 500 races. Penske got his start in business as general manager of a West Philadelphia Chevrolet dealer. ••