Eagles Preview :The good ’ol days

The Northeast Times takes a look back at the Philadelphia Eagles’ 1960 championship run.

The champs are here: The Philadelphia Eagles defeated Green Bay in the NFL championship game in 1960. Photo: Philadelphia Eagles

One of these days, the words “Philadelphia Eagles” and “Super Bowl Champions” will be used in the same sentence. When it does finally happen, millions of fans will line up along South Broad Street for what will likely be the biggest championship celebration this city has ever seen. Hey, the Chicago Cubs finally put an end to the Curse of the Goat last fall, so anything is possible.

With the Eagles’ season opener against the Washington Redskins just days away, it’s the perfect time to look back at the 1960 season — the last time the Birds called themselves NFL champions. It’s been so long that many of us weren’t born yet or have simply forgotten about that day-after-Christmas present when they defeated the Green Bay Packers in front of 67,325 fans at Franklin Field (the only one played on the University of Pennsylvania campus). Yes, it happened so long ago that Veterans Stadium wasn’t even built. The team included future Hall of Famers Chuck Bednarik and Norman Van Brocklin in green and white. Trailing 13–10 in the fourth quarter, fullback Ted Dean scored on a 5-yard run to put the home team up for good while All-Pro kicker Bobby Walston added the extra point to make the final score 17–13. Philadelphia finished the year 10–2 under the leadership of head coach Buck Shaw.

The 1960 team included (from left) Billy Ray Barnes, Timmy Brown, Norman Van Brocklin, Buck Shaw and Tommy McDonald. Photo: Philadelphia Eagles

Since that crowning moment some 57 years ago, the Eagles have played in just two Super Bowls, losing both times.

The 1980 team led by Dick Vermeil played in Super Bowl XV, but lost 27–10 to the Oakland Raiders. The 2004 Eagles, under head coach Andy Reid, played the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXIX, but lost 24–21.

One of these days … ••

1960 Results

Sept. 25 Cleveland, L 41–24

Sept. 30 Dallas, W 27–25

Oct. 9 St. Louis, W 31–27

Oct. 16 Detroit, W 28–10

Oct. 23 Cleveland, W 31–29

Nov. 6 Pittsburgh, W 34–7

Nov. 13 Washington, W 19–13

Nov. 20 New York, W 17–10

Nov. 27 New York, W 31–23

Dec. 4 St. Louis, W 20–6

Dec. 11 Pittsburgh, L 27–21

Dec. 18 Washington, W 38–28

NFL Championship

Dec. 26 Green Bay, W 17–13