Decades of dedication

Jeanes Hospital is celebrating 90 years of serving the community.

Quite an accomplishment: Jeanes Hospital, 7600 Central Ave. in Burholme, is celebrating 90 years of serving the community. Besides providing emergency medical care, Jeanes offers a number of free screenings, immunizations, educational programs and support groups.

Dr. Marc P. Hurowitz, president and CEO of Jeanes Hospital, said it’s an accomplishment for any business that survives 90 years.

“In health care, that’s a particular achievement,” he said.

That’s why Hurowitz and the 1,053 employees of Jeanes Hospital are so proud to be celebrating 90 years of serving the community.

Hurowitz pointed to the staff as the key reason for the hospital’s longevity.

“It’s a tremendous team we have here at Jeanes,” he said. “We’re really excited to be celebrating the milestone.”

Hurowitz has equal praise for hospital volunteers. To volunteer, contact Rosemarie Schlegel at 215–728–2131.

“We have a wonderful volunteer program,” Hurowitz said.

Jeanes Hospital, 7600 Central Ave. in Burholme, opened on Jan. 25, 1928, with 46 beds. The hospital was founded through a provision in the will of Anna T. Jeanes, a Quaker and philanthropist who lived on the grounds until dying in 1907.

In 1947, Jeanes offered part of its grounds to the Institute for Cancer Research. In 1963, the American Oncologic Hospital came to the campus.

A cancer hospital was built in 1967, and today, Jeanes has a good working relationship with Fox Chase Cancer Center, offering oncology services since December through a partnership. Fox Chase also has use of the Jeanes emergency department for its patients.

Hurowitz is close with Dr. Richard Fisher, president and CEO of Fox Chase.

“We have a tremendously collaborative relationship with Fox Chase Cancer Center,” he said.

In 1996, Jeanes joined the Temple University Health System, a great benefit for the hospital, as lifesaving treatments from academic-trained specialists can be shared.

“Our relationship with Temple is strong and vibrant. They provide many of those services here,” Hurowitz said.

In addition, Jeanes can send its patients to Temple for services offered only at the hospital on Broad Street.

Besides providing emergency medical care, Jeanes offers a number of free screenings, immunizations, educational programs and support groups.

Today, Jeanes is licensed for 146 beds, but treats many more people than that, as the lengths of hospital stays have been decreasing.

The patients base is in the Northeast, Eastern Montgomery County and Lower Bucks County.

“More and more is done on an outpatient basis,” Hurowitz said.

Hurowitz is a Somerton native who attended Loesche Elementary School before moving to Lower Moreland Township.

After graduating from medical school, he treated patients in Fishtown.

“I practiced in Fishtown before it was trendy,” he said.

Hurowitz has been with Temple for 14 years

In March 2015, he replaced Linda Grass as president and CEO of Jeanes.

As with all health systems, finances are a challenge.

In 2007, Temple closed the maternity ward at Jeanes to balance its budget.

Hurowitz said Jeanes’ financial outlook has gotten better in the last few years.

“The bottom line has improved,” he said.

Jeanes can also boast that, last year, Consumer Reports named it a top hospital for coronary artery bypass graft surgery and aortic valve replacement surgery.

U.S. News & World Report ranks Jeanes as high performing in the treatment of heart failure.

Healthgrades gives Jeanes accolades in areas like cardiac care, neurosciences, pulmonary and gastrointestinal.

Leapfrog, a national healthcare information source, gave Jeanes Hospital an “A” for patient safety in its most recent rating of hospitals.

Every three years, Jeanes conducts a community needs assessment. A recent assessment revealed that folks wanted more outpatient services, and Jeanes listened.

“We take care of the people in our community, and our goal is to continue to serve our community,” Hurowitz said. ••