Letters to the Editor: Aug. 9

Northeast residents discuss child immigrant camps, the importance of voting and getting people who are addicted treatment.

Answers needed on border

John Sandweg, the former head of U.S. Immigration & Customs Enforcement, warns, “ …some migrant children separated from their parents (by Donald Trump and U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions) … may never be reunited …”

While outrageous in and of itself, it’s a money maker for private prison contractors who enjoy huge annual profits by holding immigrants identified for removal, asylum seekers and others. Contractors CoreCivic Inc. and GEO Group Inc. earned combined revenue exceeding $4 billion in Fiscal Year 2017. No likely coincidence that Trump’s election and his announcement of plans to nominate Sessions as attorney general resulted in shares of CoreCivic to rocket over 95 percent.

Further, GEO made a $225,000 payment to a Super PAC supporting Trump … a donation made while such companies were negotiating with the Justice Department regarding continued use of private prisons at a federal level; the current use of private prisons reverses the Obama administration’s policy.

As a cancer on the identity of American democracy, decency and morality, how can these abominations be permitted?

A crime against humanity is defined as “a deliberate act, typically as part of a systematic campaign, an act that causes human suffering or death on a large scale.” Why are there no strident, ongoing, day-after-day outcries and expressions of outrage from members of Congress, religious leaders and the media, demanding answers to the following question?

How many children — imprisoned by Trump and Sessions — toddlers and adolescents have become physically abused, sickened or “lost” for all time to their parents, totally unaccounted for or, God forbid, deceased? And why, in the United States of America, is it necessary to ask such a question?

Until such time if any, such a question is definitively and verifiably answered by the Trump administration, and that a viable plan for family reunification is forthcoming, in my opinion, Sessions should be placed in coercive incarceration.

Courts have the discretion and power to impose contempt sanctions and order incarceration to compel compliance; and the American media have the moral responsibility and obligation to keep the persisting existence of this abomination in the forefront of public consciousness lest such an insidious political pandering act of inhumanity continue indefinitely.

Arthur Gurmankin

Bustleton

Don’t vote, can’t complain

Rep. Brendan Boyle is introducing legislation that will perhaps bring election days to weekends as a way to raise our voter turnout numbers.

It is certainly a no-brainer that elected Democratic officials would love a higher voter turnout, especially since the Dems have around a 7–1 registered voter edge over the GOP in Philadelphia.

Don’t get me wrong. Brother Boyles, in fact, both of your offices have been very instrumental with my personal needs (especially being a Republican committeeman). Thank you.

On average, the USA has generally around a 55-percent voter turnout, while only 60 percent of the population is eligible. Weekend voting would probably increase voter turnout, especially with the younger generation that often works during the week.

I have an issue with people who bad-mouth society and neighborhoods, racial tensions and useless politicians. Perhaps those people would go to the polls on Tuesdays or weekends so that they can make a change. You people want change? Go vote and voice your opinion. If you don’t, then don’t complain.

Bill Heiser Jr.

Mayfair

Addicts need treatment

Recently, my mother was taken to the emergency room at Nazareth Hospital.

It was sad to see the number of patients in the waiting area who appeared to be drug addicts.

Something has to be done about the drug epidemic. Addiction needs to be treated as the disease it is.

My mother, who received excellent care both in the emergency room and on the fifth floor, is recuperating nicely at home.

Rosemary Callaghan

Winchester Park