Meditation Column: An answer can lead to limitless understanding

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“Answer” is the reaction or resulting information provided or acquired to a question, situation or a statement. The end result of the acquisition of knowledge. For the student of meditation, it is the end result of questions (answers) that become the focus of their observation.

You have heard it, said it, desired it… Seems we share this behavior, not only individually but as groups, governments, organizations, teachers, students, etc.; we want an answer. We want, need, demand, expect, look for, like to get an answer and so on. Sometimes we accept it; often, as students, we question the answer, usually for good reason or to gain more knowledge. We are given the wrong answers, the true answer, the manipulative answers and, of course, the loving ones, as well as many other answers.

The student of observation (through meditation) brings something else to the answers that are given or displayed before them. They add an awareness of the limitations of the answers the people of the world are providing, as to who and what we are, “Why we are here” as many say, and what’s really going on in the midst of this thing we call creation or all that is.

The stranger approached the teacher and said, “Who and what are you?”

The teacher said, “To the best of my awareness, a human being.”

“Well, that’s not an answer, what do you do? What is your name? Where are you from? What is your religion?”

Lovingly, the teacher responded, “Like you, the people of the world, societies, and families and friends, have defined us by tangible observation, which is subject to change. Everything you ask of me to identify myself are more or less things that are all subject to change. You may identify me by your list, but human being answers your questions best, leaving an awareness of unlimited possibilities of what you and I truly are. Namaste.”

A meditation, try it out here and there, when and if it comes to your mind or not. You can, of course, practice meditation purposefully with intention or without intention. Bring your awareness to moments you answer something or when something is answered for you. Be aware if judgments or mental fantasies arise. It’s OK. Just acknowledge them and continue. Bring your attention to whether the answer limits your thinking of that of the listener. For instance, “The universe is big,” compared to, “The universe consists of billions and billions of galaxies and its very existence appears to be beyond (appears to be) human comprehension and that’s OK.”

One answer limits, one answer opens us to limitless understanding, including our awareness of our presence and consciousness in the existence of all that is.

It’s a new day. Your day! ••