Council approves Roosevelt Boulevard speed cameras

A City Council vote on Thursday paved the way for speed cameras to be installed on Roosevelt Boulevard.

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The final hurdle between Roosevelt Boulevard and speed cameras was cleared Thursday, as City Council adopted legislation allowing for automated enforcement on the notoriously dangerous road.

Seven to 11 cameras will be installed on the Boulevard between 9th Street and the Bucks County line. Once the system is in place, anyone going 11 miles per hour or more over the posted speed limit will receive a ticket in the mail.

The bill authorizing speed cameras was passed unanimously by Council.

“We know that speed is especially deadly for people walking and biking, and that if we can get motorists to change their behavior and slow down, we can reduce crashes and save lives,” Ninth District Councilwoman Cherelle Parker said in a statement. “The passage of this legislation is a victory for anyone who wishes to travel safely on Roosevelt Boulevard.”

Parker introduced the legislation, and it was co-sponsored by councilmembers Darrell Clarke, Maria Quinones-Sanchez and Cindy Bass.

The bill was backed by the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, AAA Mid-Atlantic, the Clean Air Council and other transportation advocacy organizations. Speed cameras have been opposed by the National Motorists Association.

A fine of $100 will be levied against drivers going more than 11 but less than 20 miles per hour over the limit, according to the bill. Those traveling between 20 miles and 30 miles over the limit will get a $125 ticket, and anyone going more than 30 miles over the limit will be fined $150.

There will be a 60-day grace period after the cameras are set up when violators will receive a warning notice. Warning signs for the automated system will be positioned all along the Boulevard.

The program will be administered by the Philadelphia Parking Authority.

Thursday’s vote capped an effort that started in Harrisburg to legalize automated speed enforcement in Pennsylvania. Gov. Tom Wolf last year signed off on a five-year speed camera pilot for the Boulevard and construction zones across the state. ••