Mayfair hosts first ever Grand Prix

The Mayfair Grand Prix and Community Festival brought racing and more to Cottman and Frankford on Saturday.

Drivers compete Saturday at the Mayfair Grand Prix, which was held at Cottman and Frankford Avenue. JACK TOMCZUK / TIMES PHOTO

Thousands of people gathered at Cottman and Frankford avenues Saturday for the first ever Mayfair Grand Prix and Community Festival.

NASCAR drivers Darryl “Bubba” Wallace Jr. and Daniel Hemric, elected officials, local business owners and others zipped around in high-powered go-karts on a track set up at the intersection.

NASCAR driver Bubba Wallace poses for a photo with a fan Saturday afternoon before racing in the Mayfair Grand Prix. JACK TOMCZUK / TIMES PHOTO

The event, which also featured a classic car show, food and drink vendors, live music, face painting and a bouncy house, drew more people to Cottman and Frankford than anything since the Eagles Super Bowl celebration, said Marc Collazzo, executive director of the Mayfair Business Improvement District.

“It’s a beautiful day, and everybody’s having a good time,” Collazzo added. “We’re thrilled everybody came together the way they did.”

The BID co-hosted the Grand Prix along with Urban Youth Racing School, a Northern Liberties-based program aimed at teaching young people in the city about motorsports.

Wallace and Hemric flew in on a helicopter from Pocono Raceway, where they were preparing for a race on Sunday in NASCAR’s top series. Hemric finished 13th and Wallace 21st in the Pocono 400.

Royal Mix performs Saturday at the Mayfair Grand Prix and Community Festival. JACK TOMCZUK / TIMES PHOTO

Others who participated in the Mayfair Grand Prix’s relay race-style competition included boxer and Philadelphia native Julian Williams, FOX29 reporter Hank Flynn, Sixth District Councilman Bobby Henon and state Rep. Joe Hohenstein.

WIP SportsRadio hosts Joe DeCamara and former Eagle Jon Ritchie broadcasted from the event and called the races for those in attendance.

Police Capt. John Walker, of the 15th District, estimated that at least 2,000 to 3,000 people filtered through the festival.

“I think it’s a great thing for the community,” Walker said. ••