Senior news round-up

REUNIONS

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS

HIGH SCHOOLS

  • Abraham Lincoln, class of 1960. Oct. 10. Brookside Manor at Somerton Springs. DJ, open bar, buffet, cake, pastry table. Betty Harrison, bharrison46@gmail.com.
  • Father Judge and St. Hubert. All classes. Saturday, Aug. 7. Seaport Pier, North Wildwood.
  • Little Flower. Class of 1970. April 24. class50reunion@gmail.com.
  • St. Hubert, class of 1960. April 17. 1-5 p.m. Maltese Room, 2049 Bristol Pike, Bensalem. Lorraine Jent Hepp, 215-624-6764 or LHepp1960@aol.com. Charlene Ritchie, 215-624-6840 (Ext. 1531) or critchie@huberts.org.
  • St. Joseph’s Prep, classes 1975. ‘80, ‘85, ‘90, ‘95, 2000, 2005, 2010 and 2015. Saturday, March 27, at the school, 1733 W. Girard Ave. 215-978-1950.
  • Members of the South Philadelphia High School Class of 1968 will meet on Saturday, Oct. 16, from noon to 4 p.m. at the Waterfall Room, 2015 S. Water St. Tickets cost $55 and include an open bar and buffet luncheon. The luncheon is open to all classes of South Philadelphia High. Checks can be made payable to SPHS Class of 1968 and mailed to Maria Leati, 26 Old Republic Lane, Marlton, NJ 08053. For tickets and information, contact Stephen Michielli at 267-252-2740 or sdmichielli@yahoo.com

OTHER REUNIONS

Navy Reunions

  • Visit HullNumber.com for a listing of reunions. The site is a free service enabling Navy shipmates to renew old friendships. There are currently more than 8,700 Navy ship, submarine and air squadron personnel rosters listed. ••

Weekend of virtual activities

Congregations of Shaare Shamayim will be hosting a virtual Phenomenal February Weekend on Saturday, Feb. 20, through Monday, Feb. 22.

On Saturday at 7:30 p.m., it will be The Spirituality of Laughter with Rabbi Bob Alper. On Sunday at 2 p.m., The Matzoh Ball Diaries will feature actors sharing stories of food, culture and community. On Monday at 7:30 p.m., Jews In Space – Members of the Tribe in Orbit will be presented by the Jewish Museum of Maryland.

The cost for this weekend is $40 per program or $80 for all three.

For further information, call 215-677-1600. ••

Virtual bingo

The Sisterhood of Congregations of Shaare Shamayim is hosting its second virtual bingo on two consecutive Mondays, March 1 and 8, starting at 7 p.m.

The cost is $36 per person and includes two cards, for eight games of bingo each night.

There will be a $5 50/50 that will be called on March 8.

Send your payment to the CSS office, 9768 Verree Road, Philadelphia, PA  19115, attention: Bingo. Payment must be received no later than Feb. 18, and 

you must include your email address.

For further information, call the CSS office at 215-677-1600 and ask for Gerry or Nancy. ••

Virtual basket bingo

Redeemer Lutheran Church will hold a virtual basket bingo on Sunday, March 14, from 1 to 3 p.m.

Admission is $20 for 10 rounds of bingo. You will have six cards per round. The prize for the first nine games will be a gift basket of varying themes. The grand-finale prize is a cash prize.

All proceeds go to benefit the ministries of Redemption Lutheran Church. Everyone is welcome to play.

Visit redemptionphiladlephia.org/bingo or call 215-342-2085 to sign up by March 1. ••

Musical entertainment at meeting

The Sisterhood of Congregations of Shaare Shamayim will be hosting a virtual general meeting on Tuesday, March 9, at 7:30 p.m.

The program will feature musical entertainment by cantor Don Samuels.

Call 215-677-1600. ••

Free Yiddish Bingo

The Sisterhood of Congregations of Shaare Shamayim will be hosting a virtual general meeting on Tuesday, May 11, at 7:30 p.m.

The program will be Yiddish Bingo. There is no charge.

Call the synagogue office at 215-677-1600 to provide your email address. Materials and a meeting link will be forwarded. ••

Middletown announces new adult recreation programs

Middletown Township Parks & Recreation has a variety of adult recreation programs starting soon that are available for registration. 

Online exercise programs

The township is continuing its online exercise program offerings. The hope is that, at some point during this session, some classes can be moved outside if the weather allows. All sessions are seven weeks and cost $35 to register. The schedule is: Tai Chi with Jason on Mondays, March 1-April 12, at 6:30 p.m.; Beginning Yoga with Carol on Tuesdays, March 2-April 13, at 6 p.m.; Beginning Yoga with Lynn on Wednesdays, March 3-April 14, at 6 p.m.; Zumba with Carolyn on Thursdays, March 4-April 15, at 6 p.m.; and Gentle Yoga with Loretta on Saturdays, March 5-April 16, at 9:15 a.m. Once registered, participants will receive an email with the class link that will be used for the entire seven-week session.

Golf lessons

Get golf ready in five days. Designed to teach and improve your overall golf game. Six Saturday classes include playing a few holes on the final day. The lead instructor is Dan Hoban, head golf professional at Middletown Country Club. Cost is $112; $122 for non-residents. Location is Middletown Country Club. Sessions are Saturdays, April 10 and 17, from 10 to 11:30 a.m.; and Saturdays, April 24, May 1, 8 and 22, from 8 to 9:30 a.m.

Intro to pickleball

Pickleball is the fastest-growing sport in the nation. It is a mini-tennis game that is a combination of ping-pong, tennis and badminton played with graphite paddles and unique plastic balls. It is a great sport for all ages that is easy to learn and provides plenty of exercise. Students will learn etiquette, safety, rules, strokes, serves, scoring and game play in this one-day workshop. Taught by certified instructor Marcy Lynch. This is a great way for new players to learn more and refine their skills before joining the local pickleball group on Mondays and Thursdays at Firefighters’ Park. Cost is $45; $55 for non-residents. Location is Firefighters’ Park. Session 1 is Saturday, April 24. Session 2 is Saturday, May 15. Session 3 is Saturday, June 12. All sessions are from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

The new registration system is now live. Visit middletownbucks.org/Departments/Parks-Recreation/Program-Registration for more information. Direct any questions to Patrick at pgraham@middletownbucks.org or 215-750-3890. ••

Dept. of Aging calls for critical updates to the Older Adults Protective Services Act

With the ongoing rise of financial exploitation and other forms of elder abuse, the state Department of Aging is urging the General Assembly to prioritize and enact critical updates to the Older Adults Protective Services Act in its new 2021-22 legislative session.

Enacted in 1987, OAPSA has served as Pennsylvania’s system for protecting the health, safety and welfare of older adults who are at imminent risk of these serious offenses. The department, along with many stakeholders and the courts, agree on the critical importance of protecting older Pennsylvanians and have called on these much-needed changes to the law for more than a decade.

“As the department responsible for advocacy and protection of Pennsylvania’s older adults, updated OAPSA would help to adequately address changes in the direct care workforce and the facilities that serve older adults. It would also help to respond to the rise of financial exploitation as a form of elder abuse,” said Secretary of Aging Robert Torres. “Unfortunately, we were unable to get these updates across the finish line before the end of the last session. I am pleased to see that Sen. Mensch has issued a co-sponsorship memo and hope we can see these legislative changes quickly proposed and passed during the new legislative session.”

The department is seeking the following critical updates to OAPSA:

  • Strengthening background checks for all employees, both new and current, who work with older adults in a long-term care setting
  • Identifying individuals who should never have an opportunity to work as a caregiver to older adults
  • Expanding the list of mandatory reporters of abuse and facilities whose employees are required to report abuse
  • Providing a clear process for reporting financial exploitation and related training for financial institutions

In September, the department released the findings of its Financial Exploitation Study of older adults. Gov. Tom Wolf directed the study to be done in his 2019 executive order issued to protect vulnerable populations in the commonwealth.

“The study issued five recommendations. Two of the recommendations related to passage of updates to OAPSA to help further protect vulnerable seniors from financial exploitation. Another recommendation to create a financial exploitation task force, comprised of public and private sector representatives, has been initiated by the department and the task force is working to develop comprehensive and collaborative approaches to help tackle financial exploitation in a meaningful way,” said Torres. “However, amending OAPSA is critical to strengthen protections for older adults and help prevent them from becoming victims.”

Torres noted the volume, type and scope of abuse has increased dramatically in the more than 30 years since OAPSA became PDA’s legal guide to protecting older Pennsylvanians. According to the department’s 2019-2020 Older Adults Protective Services Annual Report, cases of suspected elder abuse have increased 80 percent over the previous five years.

The department’s Protective Services Office investigates and supports older adults who become victims of abuse. Anyone suspecting elder abuse should call the statewide reporting hotline at 800-490-8505. It operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week. ••