Government partners with community organizations to improve Burholme monument

The Burholme World War I monument at Five Points.
The flower beds at the Burholme World War I monument are maintained by Boy Scout Troop 160.

Local government continues to partner with community organizations to help revive the Northeast business corridors.

State Rep. Jared Solomon (D-202nd dist.) along with Councilman Brian O’Neill, former Councilman Al Taubenberger, Sen. Tina Tartaglione, Rep. Brendan Boyle, Burholme Civic Association, the Oxford Circle Christian Community Development Association and Pamela Baranackie, acting treasurer of Take Back Your Neighborhood, used a state-funded grant from the Department of Community and Economic Development to improve the Burholme World War I monument at Five Points.

Boy Scout Troop 160 maintains the flower beds and flags that surround the monument.

The grant, which was acquired by Solomon, was used to power wash the monument and add additional flower beds, new lighting, flags, plus a new plaque will be added

“The effort to secure additional funds to improve accessibility to the monument continues with the support of the above-listed partners,” Solomon said in an email.

Baranackie, who painted the plaque commemorating the names of soldiers who served, keeps up the monument on major holidays along with Boy Scout Troop 160. Before, the names were the same color as the plaque and hard to read, now they stand out in brilliant gold.

“It’s an honor to remember,” Baranackie said. “Thousands of people pass by here every day, I want them to be able to read the names.”

Baranackie said the steps need to be repaved next, a project that could cost $70,000.

Maggie Hernandez, economic development director for OCCCDA, said that this project meant a lot to her as a Navy veteran.

“It’s a beautiful thing,” Hernandez said.

From left to right, Maggie Hernandez, economic development director for OCCCDA, state Rep. Jared Solomon and Pamela Baranackie displayed a check for improvements to the Burholme war monument.

The project comes after Solomon, O’Neill and Boyle penned an op-ed in the Northeast Times three years ago stating veterans are a high priority for them.

“I think it’s really important whenever you talk about reimagining the corridor or bringing placemaking properties to a community that the common memory includes not just the future of a community, which is the great diversity and dynamic nature of our community,” Solomon said. “But that always needs to be tied to our amazing past.”

“Today we tie the two together,” Solomon continued. ••